ATM350

Cardioid Condenser Clip-On Microphone

MSRP* US$489.00
Two-Year Limited End-User Warranty

*Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price. Actual selling price may vary; please check with an authorized Audio-Technica dealer.



  • Overview
  • Features
  • Specifications
  • Downloads
  • Reviews
  • Q & A

  • Overview


    Supplied with Audio-Technica’s versatile UniMount® clip and new violin mount, the low-profile ATM350 is an exceptional cardioid condenser microphone designed to clip to brass, upright bass, reeds, piano, snare, toms, and violin. The microphone offers a crisp, clear, well-balanced response, even at high SPLs. It features an integral 80 Hz hi-pass filter on the in-line power module. Its cardioid polar pattern reduces pickup of sounds from the side and rear for effective protection against feedback.
  • Features


    • Low-profile design for minimum visibility

    • UniMount® clip permits accurate positioning, provides shock resistance and protects element

    • Unique violin mount permits unobtrusive placement of microphone between the instrument’s bridge and tailpiece

    • Crisp, clear, well-balanced response, even at high SPLs

    • Cardioid polar pattern reduces pickup of sounds from the sides and rear, improving isolation of desired sound source

    • Interchangeable elements available for hypercardioid and omnidirectional polar patterns

    • Corrosion-resistant contacts from gold-plated XLRM-type connector

    • Rugged, all-metal design and construction for years of trouble-free use

  • Specifications

    ELEMENTFixed-charge back plate permanently polarized condenser
    POLAR PATTERNCardioid
    FREQUENCY RESPONSE40-20,000 Hz
    LOW FREQUENCY ROLL-OFF80 Hz, 12 dB/octave
    OPEN CIRCUIT SENSITIVITY–49 dB (3.5 mV) re 1V at 1 Pa
    IMPEDANCE50 ohms
    MAXIMUM INPUT SOUND LEVEL149 dB SPL, 1 kHz at 1% T.H.D.
    DYNAMIC RANGE (typical)122 dB, 1 kHz at Max SPL
    SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO67 dB, 1 kHz at 1 Pa
    PHANTOM POWER REQUIREMENTS11-52V DC, 3.5 mA typical
    SWITCHFlat, roll-off
    WEIGHT (MICROPHONE)14.5 g (0.5 oz)
    WEIGHT (POWER MODULE)81.2 g (2.9 oz)
    DIMENSIONS (MICROPHONE)37.8 mm (1.49") long,
    12.2 mm (0.48") diameter
    DIMENSIONS (POWER MODULE)92.9 mm (3.66") long,
    18.9 mm (0.74") diameter
    OUTPUT CONNECTOR (POWER MODULE)Integral 3-pin XLRM-type
    CABLE4.0 m (13.1') long (permanently attached to microphone), 3.2 mm (0.13") diameter, 2-conductor shielded cable with TA3F-type connector
    ACCESSORIES FURNISHEDAT8542 power module; AT8418 UniMount® microphone instrument mount; AT8468 violin mount; soft protective pouch
    AUDIO-TECHNICA CASE STYLEM36
    Click on the chart to view the larger image
    POLAR PATTERN
    POLAR PATTERN
    FREQUENCY RESPONSE
    FREQUENCY RESPONSE



    Conditions
  • Downloads

    ATM350 Specification Sheet (pdf 96.19 KB)
    ATM350 Submittal Sheet (pdf 372.91 KB)
    Optional Windscreens / Mounts
  • Reviews

    REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

    by PowerReviews
    Audio-TechnicaATM350 Cardioid Condenser Clip-On Microphone
     
    5.0

    (based on 2 reviews)

    Ratings Distribution

    • 5 Stars

       

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    5.0

    Works great for trombone and saxophones of all sizes also!

    By 

    from Denver, CO, USA

    Site Member

    Pros

    • Brass
    • Field Recording
    • very solid padded clamp would never scratch

    Cons

    • trumpet mutes can interfere

    Best Uses

      Comments about Audio-Technica ATM350 Cardioid Condenser Clip-On Microphone:

      Use these mics with a 10 instrument dance/swing big band indoor and outdoor for 8 shows now. On sax from soprano to baritone, they are great solutions. As the previous review said, no surrounding noise or wind is picked up. Also worked for me on trombone, when he uses a mute it is smaller than the bell and the mic mounts on the left away from the right hand applying the mute. Both trumpets present a problem as they can bash the mic or knock it off when they apply mutes that nearly span the whole bell. Guess that's the risk in swing or dixieland bands. Maybe I can train them to take off the mic before they pick up the mute. After the show, mics are removed and clipped to 2' tall straight pin stands I made from paper towel holders bases, so they don't just drop mics on the floor. My favorite AT mic.

      • What best describes the environment the product was used in?:
      • Intermediate
      • What best describes your level of audio knowledge?:
      • Live Sound
      • How long have you used this product?:
      • Over a year
      • Reliability:
      •  
      • Audio Quality:
      •  
      • Durability:
      •  
      • Ease of Use:
      •  

      (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

       
      5.0

      Excellent on Horns

      By 

      from Jackson, MI, USA

      Site Member

      Pros

      • Brass
      • Strings

      Cons

      • non i can imagine. if it will clip on...try it!

      Best Uses

        Comments about Audio-Technica ATM350 Cardioid Condenser Clip-On Microphone:

        Purchased for use on trumpets used in contemprary worship services. Player is normally positioned in fairly near proximity to semi-enclosed drum kit as well as sub-woofers. Virtually no pickup of surrounding sound as very little gain is required for reinforcement of the horns. Trumpet player is also able to switch horns quickly transferring the mic from one instrument to another with no handling noise.

        Have only used the violin attchment a couple of times but the results have been excellent. It's a bit of a struggle inserting the mic element into the velcro attachment but once in place it is very secure.

        Beware however as the first time it was used with a violin our sound tech was not aware that the violinist was only playing during the prelude to a special service. Anticipating that he would remain on stage for the opening song, the mic was left open as the violinist set his instrument down and began removing the velcro from the violin. Needless to say that sound was picked up quite well.

        Despite that humourous incident and lesson learned the ATM350 has a permanent place in our microphone arsenal. The sound reproduction is very natural and unwanted noise is virtually non-existant.

        These are the only 2 applications we have tries so far. If it weren't for the fact that it is so regularly in use I would definataely be trying it out in other applications. Perhaps it's time to pick up another.

        • What best describes the environment the product was used in?:
        • Expert
        • What best describes your level of audio knowledge?:
        • House of Worship
        • How long have you used this product?:
        • Over a year
        • Reliability:
        •  
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      • Q & A

        Do you have questions about this product?

        Get answers from real customers and in-house experts with AnswerBox.

        23 Questions | 26 Answers
        Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
        • Q:

          Flute

          Does it come with other clips , ie. for Flute?, and for Clarinet
          Asked on 6/4/2015 by jazzygirl from Florida, USA

          1 answer

          • A:

            The ATM350 Clip-on Microphone includes the UniMount (gooseneck mount) and a violin mount. The violin mount is a velcro strap with a loop sewn into it to slide the microphone into. It typically goes around the strings between the bridge and the tailpiece. The strap should accomodate a flute. For a clarinet, you may have to add a bit more velcro material for it to be long enough to go around it.

            Answered on 6/8/2015 by AudioSolutionsSpec1 from Stow,OH
        • Q:

          ATM 350 Wor ATM 350 connections

          Looks like I mistakingly bought the 350w with the 4 pin connector. I don't want to go wireless, I want to plug this into my PA or mixing board during recording. I also have a Phantom power supply and as well the AT8538 11-52v remote power module. I want to hook this all up but the 4 pin mic connector doesn't connect to the module which is 3 pin....Anything I can do?
          Asked on 1/9/2015 by luigi from panama

          1 answer

          • A:

            Either exchange the ATM350cW for the ATM350, or purchase the AT8539 Power Module which has the 4-pin type input connector.

            Answered on 1/20/2015 by AudioSolutionsSpec1 from Stow,OH
        • Q:

          Why is this appropriate for an upright bass? Input has 80Hz high pass filter

          In a previous question/answer entry about the appropriateness of the ATM350 as an upright bass pickup, the answer indicated: yes, it's appropriate.

          How is this possible? The product's overview states: It features an integral 80 Hz hi-pass filter on the in-line power module.

          The 'D', 'A', and 'E' strings of an upright bass are at frequencies below 80Hz.

          It would seem like anything played below 80 Hz would be filtered out.

          Please clarify.
          Asked on 7/5/2014 by Griffdb from San Francisco, CA, USA

          1 answer

          • A:

            On the power module, there is a switch that allows one to switch the response from flat to the 80Hz high-pass filter. Note that the low end responses starts at 40Hz.

            Answered on 7/6/2014 by Griffdb from San Francisco, CA, USA
        • Q:

          1. have just purchased ATM350 mic with AT8542 rpm What does recessed white switch in AT8542 do ? 2. using an old Ross PC7250 mixer with no apparent ph

          1. have just purchased ATM350 mic with AT8542 rpm What does recessed white switch in AT8542 do ?
          2. using an old Ross PC7250 mixer with no apparent phantom power.What type of pp unit is recommended with ATM350 to conect to this?
          Asked on 2/16/2014 by slainte from new zealand

          1 answer

          • A:

            Thank you for your inquiry. The switch is the low frequency roll off switch. When set to the straight line it is passing all frequencies. When set to the bent line frequencies below 80 Hz are rolled off. The microphone requires at least 11 v of phantom power. If you need an external supply you can use our AT8801.

            Answered on 2/18/2014 by AudioSolutionsManager from Stow, OH
        • Q:

          aDAPTER AVAILABLE?

          I own an ATM350 that I use on my tenor and alto saxophones. Do you have a clip that I can use to also use my mic on my flute?
          Asked on 12/30/2013 by RCOMEAU21

          1 answer

          • A:

            I don't know if they have responded, but I mic a clarinet for a swing - big band player and found location must be totally different. The clarinet doesn't make its primary sound from the bell. It is primarily the reed and the body/body holes. 'Bell only' seems to just make woof-hoof sound in my headphones. Try your flute with the atm350 clipped to a fixed stand facing the end at 1" or 2" and listening on headphones that cut out the room sound so you just hear the mic. Or have someone you trust do the headphone listening job. I bet the end of the flute is worse that just the bell on the clarinet. Then move the instrument around the mic and find where it sounds the best. I suspect it will be very close to the blow hole. I don't know the terminology of flutes, what is above the blowhole? or below? so I'll call the short end 'above' the blowhole:

            Another mic company, US based, makes an item the fits the mini mic at the short end (tuning cork end?) above the blowhole holding the mic face toward the lips. You can probably wrap the violin velcro on that short end and mount the ATM350 mic. Lost the violin piece? might not have gone all the way around anyway, or been to long. So wrap Any velcro strip around the open end (above?) the blowhole, and wrap another velcro strip over that first one with the mic trapped in between. With the velcro 'hooks' facing down onto the flute on the bottom layer of velcro, this shouldn't muffle any of the resonance. If it works then afterwards have someone sew the loop into the one strip of velcro so it looks like the violin piece. But you probably don't want the mic metal body to touch the flute body, keep velcro or a thin felt pad in between the metals.

            Answered on 1/10/2014 by Bill1950 from Denver, CO, USA
        • Q:

          Will the ATM350 perform equally well with different levels of phantom power?

          Will the ATM350 perform equally well with different levels of phantom power? For example, will the mic perform as well with the 15V or 18V volts often provided by blending preamps, as it would with the (give or take) 48V it would receive from a mixing board?
          Asked on 12/26/2013 by JeremyD from Nashville, TN, USA

          1 answer

          • A:

            The ATM350 (includes the AT8542 Power Module for wired use) will perform the same on any Phantom Power voltage from 11-52v. In other words, it will perform the same with 15v as it will with 48v. Again, the ATM350 comes with the AT8542 power module which is necessary for wired use, and will operate equally on 11-52v.

            Thanks!

            Answered on 1/3/2014 by AudioSolutionsSpec2 from Stow, OH
        • Q:

          Can it clip on a sound hole of a acoustic guitar?

          I'm looking for a inexpensive solution for mic'ing an acoustic guitar for a live environment. I was wondering if I can clip the ATM350 on the circular opening of an ordinary acoustic guitar. What is the dimensions of the clip element?

          I am thinking of placing the microphone inside the sound hole of the acoustic guitar. If there are better placement/mounting options, please enlighten me.
          Asked on 7/15/2013 by Ilbeman from New York, NY, USA

          1 answer

          • A:

            Thank you for your inquiry. I do not think this a good option. First it could get in the way and secondly attaching anything to the top could alter the sound. One of our endorsed artists uses this mic by attaching a tongue depress to the side of the guitar just below the neck with gaff tape and then clips the mic on to it. I've tried this as well and it works very well.

            Answered on 7/25/2013 by AudioSolutionsManager from Stow, OH
        • Q:

          Using ATM350 for violin - feedback issues

          Hi,

          I am using the ATM350 on my violin for performing with other instruments that are using mics on stag along with a PA and monitors. I experience a good deal of feedback when using this mic and am looking for suggestions on how to avoid it. I have been using this mic for years and love it, but the feedback can be frustrating and we end up turning my mic off in the monitors completely and often turning me down to the point where people complain because they can't hear the violin.

          Is there anything I can do to prevent feedback? Other mics on stage, orientation of the mic on the violin, levels, etc? It seems to ring the most on the D string for some reason.

          I currently use the clip to mount the mic to my violin and place above the f-hole. I am thinking maybe I should go back to the violin specific mount, but I no longer have it. I had issues with my breathing being picked up from my nose!!! (very embarrassing... I get really into it when I'm playing I guess).

          ANY suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I love this mic and never want to go back to a pickup! It sounds amazing and I get tons of complements from others about the sound quality when we have it set up right - but variables change from setting to setting, so anything I can do to maintain some consistency and avoid feedback would be awesome.

          Thanks!
          Asked on 6/25/2013 by FiddleNich

          2 answers

          • A:

            Hi, FiddleNich. for a start try to cut the feedback from a specific frequency band, or all the low freq the violin doesn't produce. You can hook up a 31 band single channel Equilizer thru the channel insert plug if you have one on the PA mixer. Route 100% of your mic channel thru the effects-insert loop, not just part of it like you would with a reverb.) If your lucky it is another instruments sound coming from the monitor at 200 or 300 Hz that cause the feedback and EQ-ing that out solves the problem for a high-pitch instrument like a violin. Just start playing your violin low notes and gradually cut the low frequencies completely and see where you notice an effect on your sound. Stop there and see if you still have feedback with the full group playing. If none of that helps, get the feedback started and selectively cut EQ frequencies one at a time raising them back to 0/unity gain at each one. Do this until you find where the feedback frequency(s) is, see if you can live with your violin sound with the EQ set to cut there. (the more eq bands the finer this can selectively cut that particular frequency range, 31 bands is probably min for this purpose.) All that said, the feedback may change frequencies from room to room and from room temperature to temperature. I've set up in daytime temp, sound check was fine and show at night had feedback because the cooler air is thicker, or the room full of people makes it warmer and thinner.

            The only perfect solution would be an in-ear monitor for you, while you stay away from or in front of the band's floor wedges. Or get them for the whole band and dump the monitors. The other plus is that on a loud stage, in ear monitors in both ears can be real hearing savers. I keep that in mind because I already have a man-made replacement for my left stapes bone (the wishbone shape in the inner ear.) It works better than my damaged one, but no where near as good as the one I was born with.

            Beyond in-ears, you can work on the angles of your mic versus the angle the monitors face up at you. You probably get no feedback when the violin body completely blocks the floor monitor from the face of the mic. It starts when you tip the violin towards vertical, towards the monitor front. Floor wedges when you are right over them and tip the violin to near vertical are going to be well within the under -3db rejection of a cardioid shape pattern, IF the mic face is straight down 0 degrees at the strings. If mic face is at 90 degrees to the strings it will be pointing the mic butt end (that the cable comes out of) at the monitor, which is what you'd desire but 90 degrees to the strings is too much off angle. With a cardioid pattern you have 60 degrees around 0 on the front face with perfect reception of sound, and 60 degrees at the BACK around 180 degrees of that mic with -15 dB rejection in this case. Thats 5 times less receptive in that back 60 degrees! Try to get the mic face at the edge of its 30 degrees off axis to the strings, while the monitor is in the opposite 30 degrees segment (off 180 degrees/the butt end ie. 210 degrees) . Sort of like a teeter totter line drawn through the long axis of the mic, a flat teeter totter is a straight thru line is 0 to 180 degees, and one that diverges 30 degrees to 210 degrees pointing at the monitor on one end and the violin surface and strings at the mic face end of the line.

            Another fix is to get the monitors closer to your ears, so they can be turned down and quiet the whole stage, also possibly make that 30 to 210 degree line achievable. Peavey makes a 3 driver box call the Impulse II that mounts on a microphone stand - much closer to the ears. And your current monitor power amp can probably run 8 of them easily so that gets them closer to each band members ears. They are 16 ohm resistance so 4 can run off one power amp channel to present a 4 ohm load - and they have attenuation POTS so they can be individually turned down. Start with them all the way up, set the amp feed as loud as the deaf-ist member wants, then everyone else can turn their own down to what they'd like. I suppose it would be half the cost of in-ear monitors, the boxes are about $130 each. I've bought about 10 off eb-- averaging $60.

            I've seen symphonies using clear plexiglass to protect the hearing of the front row players from the horns in the row behind them, such as is done around drum kits in live recording situations and churches. Maybe it could be fashioned into something that blocks direct line monitor to the mic, but not to your ears. Probably only work in one posture like a symphony musician tho.

            Sometimes the stage is loud because one or more guitar-bass-keyboard speaker-amp is/are to loud and monitors have to be turned up to match that. Get these guitar amps up off the floor 2 foot or more on risers/stands so 1. the instrument's player's ears hear how loud it is, not just their ankles, maybe turn it down some, and 2. the crowd also hears it better! Could then use the plexiglass screens in a tall, narrow panel behind just you? The only thing that really sounds better on the floor through floor coupling is a subwoofer, and you should never have one behind you on stage or deafness is arriving very soon.

            Now I'm only doing brass based swing band music, only the vocal and e-piano go thru the monitors, the ones I mention above on mic stands. When I did church worship groups, they always wanted more and more monitors from floor wedges. I could turn off the front of the house speakers and hardly anyone in the first 10 rows noticed a volume change, because all they heard in that area was the stage monitors that faced away from the room! Too much stage monitor sound volume plays havoc with musicality and makes the front of the house sound muddy because the PA speakers are competing with the stage monitors that project out the back of the monitor box (all bass) the omni-directional component of all low bass sounds and reflection off the back wall-ceiling corner that the wedges aim at (primarily bass frequencies get reflected, out of phase and out of timing). Vocals and mid frequencies get lost in the monitor noise. Try to achieve a quieter stage. Quieter stages are more musical stages, are you making music?

            Answered on 1/10/2014 by Bill1950 from Denver, CO, USA
          • A:

            Thank you for your inquiry. Feedback is not actually the fault of the microphone. Feedback occurs when the amplified sound from any loudspeaker reenters the sound system through a microphone and is amplified again and again causing a loop. To avoid or lessen the likelihood of feedback try some of these steps:
            - Keep the loudspeakers in front of the microphone and or pointing away from the microphone. If the speakers are behind the microphone, then feedback is nearly guaranteed.
            - This is a (cardiod) microphone. A cardioid microphone has its maximum rejection at the rear of the mic. Keep monitors or loudspeakers in this area of maximum reject
            - Place the microphone close to the sound source. Each time the distance between the source and the microphone is halved, the sound system output will increase by 6dB. This will allow you to decrease the gain of the microphone.
            - Use an equalizer or feedback eliminator to dampen the frequencies where feedback is occurring. Please let me know if you need additional information.

            Answered on 7/3/2013 by AudioSolutionsManager from Stow, OH
        • Q:

          lapel clip modification

          Is it possible to use the ATM350 in a dreadnought guitar with a lapel clip modification.maybe clip it onto the soundhole with the mic on the inside of the guitar?
          Asked on 4/23/2013 by wiam from South-AFRICA

          1 answer

          • A:

            To use an ATM350 with a dreadnought guitar, I know of one very popular performer that uses the ATM350 with the included gooseneck clip (AT8418) on acoustic guitar. He does this by taping a tongue depressor (or popsicle stick) to the front edge of the body of his guitar just below the neck with gaff tape. He then clips the mic with gooseneck mount on to this. This is the only option I know of for using an ATM350 on an acoustic guitar.

            Another option would be to use the AT831R or AT831b with the AT8444 Microphone Instrument Adapter.
            - The AT8444 will NOT work with the ATM350 .

            Thanks!

            Answered on 4/25/2013 by AudioSolutionsSpec2 from Stow, OH
        • Q:

          Does the ATM 350 clip open wide enough to clip on a ukulele headstock? Thank you.
          Asked on 2/28/2013 by JohnMark

          1 answer

          • A:

            Thank you for your inquiry. The clip opens .38 ". I doubt that it would open wide enough to clip on to your headstock. I have seen various ways to attach this to instruments. For example, one popular, professional musician tapes a tongue depressor to the front of his guitar with duct tape and clips the microphone to that.

            Answered on 3/12/2013 by AudioSolutionsManager from Stow, OH
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